Part 2, Narrative bridging on testing an experience

I wonder if you remember the feeling that slowly came over you when you wrote what would become your last letter to Santa? If you have never written to Santa or, you are still writing, maybe you have the experience of buying a lottery ticket and is thus able to recognise the feeling of doubt when questioning your beliefs, intentions, and desires, as to why you are putting hopes into something you know won’t correspond to your desires? The feeling I´m trying to describe is the same I have every time I return to science in matters that concern the narrative, which is complicated, to say the least. So in January, I decided to settle the relationship, with the same confidence I had when writing my last letter to Santa I wrote my last words to science in my text “Are you a man or a mouse.

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Are you a man or a mouse?

What differs our thinking from animals is that we can create meanings based on beliefs, desires, and dreams. What it means in practice is that we can have a dream about an adventure and start building a boat and create a meaning that motivates our actions. We can also stand on a carpet and pretend it´s a boat and share the experience with others by creating a meaning that makes others join in. But due to the conflicting currents between the church and science during the Enlightenment everything relating to our ability to imagine was put aside in order to study nature. In this way our creation of meaning based on beliefs, desires and dreams, together with stories that were seen as a carrier of fantasies and illusions, and where the narrative became the scapegoat to all creations that didn´t correspond to reality, were bundle off away from science and labelled with the sign saying “disbelief”.

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Part 4, The need for retrieval of the consciousness

To end up fighting for children´s rights was an awakening since I had resided as a good dog within the bubble of entertainment believing that a meaningful experience was directed towards something positive and where my wheeling of the narrative vehicle differed from the opposite which could be seen in the absence of a reciprocally shared goal where expectations by a “we”, based on preconceptions, considered to know what was best for others. Continue reading

Part 3, When the cognitive vehicle of narrative backfires

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If anyone remembers the 2D pictures, which were popular in the nineties, that you had to stare at until a 3D image suddenly appeared, that´s how the challenge felt when trying to make people aware about the narrative. You might also recall how frustrating it was to have people standing over you when staring at the 2D image and hear them saying: “can you see it, can you see it?” and if not seeing “can´t you see it, can´t you see it?” or even worse, “I can´t believe you do not see it!” The only thing the 2D images did was to split people into a “we” and “them” and made them, that didn’t see, frustrated. Continue reading