How to control E3 by finding Nemo

For a number of years ago I lived in a rainforest until one day I couldn´t stand not being able to see the horizon and the only thing I was staring at was my skin looking for leeches that appeared from nowhere looking like a stroke of a pen on the skin. If not being attentive to the thin black line and remove it quickly, it wouldn´t take long before you found a lump, big as a plum, attached to the skin that had to be unscrewed. The only thing I felt sorry about by leaving was to miss the yearly event when people from the distant and widely spread cattle stations gathered in the village to find a life companion. It was the biggest event of expectations I had ever experienced until E3 turned up. Continue reading

Part 4, The need for retrieval of the consciousness

To end up fighting for children´s rights was an awakening since I had resided as a good dog within the bubble of entertainment believing that a meaningful experience was directed towards something positive and where my wheeling of the narrative vehicle differed from the opposite which could be seen in an absence of a reciprocally shared goal where expectations by a “we”, based on preconceptions, considered to know what was best for others. Continue reading

Part 3, When the cognitive vehicle of narrative backfire

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If anyone remembers the 2D pictures, which were popular in the nineties, that you had to stare at until a 3D image suddenly appeared, that´s how the challenge felt when trying to make people aware about the narrative. You might also recall how frustrating it was to have people standing over you when staring at the 2D image and hear them saying: “can you see it, can you see it?” and if not seeing “can´t you see it, can´t you see it?” or even worse, “I can´t believe you´re not seeing it!” The only thing the 2D images did was to split people into a “we” and “them” and made them, that didn’t see, frustrated. Continue reading

Part 1, In search for the invisible narrative

This is the home of my work and findings as a narrative constructor that I would have liked to find myself in the late nineties when moving my skills as a writer and director within film and television to development of digital and interactive media. At that time there was nothing called narrative design and when I took my master in computer science the narrative was recognised as not to be part of game studies and human-computer interaction (HCI). Narrative was like “It-Which-Must-Not-be-Named” until I met a Lyotard-reading captain of a robot football team Continue reading